BiliBili

今天画了云。

Pope

“For fools rush in where angels fear to tread.”

——“Essay on Criticism”

Many lines from this poem have become proverbial maxims.

Izaak Walton

“No life, my honest Scholar, no life so happy and so pleasant as the life of a well-governed Angler; for when the lawyer is swallowed up with business, and the statesman is preventing or contriving plots, then we sit on cowslip banks, hear the birds sing, and possess ourselves in as much quietness as these silent silver streams, which we now see glide so quietly by us…God never did make a more calm, quiet, innocent recreation than angling.”

——Izaak Walton

The key-note of which is the nostalgia for a fairer age that had passed away.(pastoral)

“我们坐在长满樱草的河岸,聆听着鸟鸣,惬意如那条波光粼粼的小溪,静静得从我们身边淌过。”

To His Coy Mistress

“Had we but world enough, and Time,
This coyness, Lady, were no crime.
We would sit down, and think which way
To walk, and pass our Long Love’s day...
But at my back I always hear
Time's winged Chariot hurrying near:
And yonder all before us lie
Deserts of vast eternity.
Thy Beauty shall no more be found;
Nor, in thy marble Vault, shall sound
My echoing Song:then Worms shall try
That long preserv'd Virginity:
And your quaint Honour turn to dust;
And into ashes all my lust.”

——Andrew Marvell

“若世事永恒,时光无限,
你这娇羞,小姐,便算不得什么罪愆。
我们便可恒坐静谧之中,思量去向何方,
历尽我们长久的爱恋……
但我总听见可惧的声音在身后回响,
那是时光之轮在无情碾近:
而我们面前,
天堑难越,荒漠无垠。
你的美将在大理石的墓穴中埋葬,
我唱的赞歌也不再回响。
那里只有肥硕的蛆虫蠕动,
染指于你那久久珍守的童贞:
你那古怪的荣誉化作尘土,
我的情欲也化为灰烬。”

John Donne

“I fix mine eye on thine, and there
Pity my picture burning in thine eye;
My picture drown’d in a transparent tear,
When I look lower I espy;
Hadst thou the wicked skill
By pictures made and marr‘d, to kill?
How many ways mightst thou perform thy will?”

——John Donne

“我凝视着你的眸子,在那里
怜悯着灼烧在你瞳孔中,我的影像;
当我低下头来,我突然看见,
我的影像淹没在一滴晶莹的泪滴中;
难道你的恶作剧
就是要毁坏我们在你眼中结合而成的影像吗?
你到底有多少方法来实现你的决心?”

John Milton

But“he that would hope to write well hereafter in laudable things ought himself to be a true poem;”

——John Milton

但是“希望写出令人称颂的作品的人。首先自己必须是一首真正的诗。”

John Lyly

“So love which by time and fancy is bred in an idle head is by time and fancy banished from the heart; or as the salamander which, being a long space nourished in the fire, at the last quenched it, so affection, having taken hold of the fancy and living as it were in the mind of the lover, in tract of time altereth and changeth the heat, and turneth it to chilliness.”

——“Euphues”

Edmund Spenser

But his hopes of employment at court were never fulfilled because he lacked the moral pliancy necessary for promotion as a courtier:

“For sooth to say, it is no sort of life,
For shepherd fit to lead in that same place,
Where each one seeks with malice and with strife,
To thrust downe other into foul disgrace,
Himselfe to raise.”

——“A Short History Of English Literature”